EPA’s Classification a Breach

I began research on the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) non- hazardous coal ash classification decision because I wanted to share research on (1) why and how EPA reached the nonhazardous decision, (2) the environmental justice implications (3) the technical, scientific, and regulatory reasons why containment of toxic, hazardous, and radioactive waste in land disposal systems continues to fail, and (4) to provide a research-based opposition to the burial of coal ash in Northampton county or in any other place.

Enraging: EPA Proposes to Raise Legal Levels of Radioactivity in Drinking Water

Enraging: EPA Proposes to Raise Legal Levels of Radioactivity in Drinking Water

Under the new proposal, no actions to protect the public would be taken even if radioactivity in drinking water were dozens or hundreds of times higher than Safe Drinking Water Act levels. This would force the public to use contaminated water containing dangerous levels of radioactivity far beyond the current standards

Day 56: Environmental Radicalism: Civil Disobedience?

Day 56: Environmental Radicalism: Civil Disobedience?

Mr. Hayes then described how revolution has been an honorable tradition for Americans, starting with our nation’s emancipation from King George. He mentioned Gandhi and King who also used radical measures and civil disobedience to create change. He described the three main components of civil disobedience: 1) to stop national, international, or transnational corporations from engaging in an injustice 2) to respectfully disagree with a situation or policy in a compassionate way 3) to rebel against something that is deeply unfair and wrong, not something that is superficially important.

Day 49: “Regulatory Favoritism in North Carolina”

Day 49: “Regulatory Favoritism in North Carolina”

“North Carolina citizens have good reason to wonder just whom their environmental regulators are trying to protect. The state’s Department of Environment and Natural Resources has engaged in a series of maneuvers that seem designed to protect the state’s largest utility, Duke Energy, from paying big fines for water pollution from coal ash ponds and meeting reasonable requirements that it move toxic coal ash to lined landfills away from rivers and lakes used for drinking water and recreation.”

Day 46: Institute Index: How cozy are Governor McCrory and Duke Energy?

Day 46: Institute Index: How cozy are Governor McCrory and Duke Energy?

It is day 46 of my 365 Days of Living Deliberately, and, clearly, as federal officials call for an investigation into the Duke Energy coal ash disaster and the state’s response to it, conflicts of interest abound with North Carolina Governor Pat McCroy and Duke Energy. According to the Institute for Southern Studies, (“a non-profit media, research and action center working for a better South”) the conflict of interest has been going on for years. For instance, Governor McCrory worked for Duke Energy for twenty-eight years before he ran for governor.